(604) 575-7900 lylek@konnerfinancial.com

Living Benefits

Juvenile Critical Illness with Return of Premium

Protection if you need it.  A refund if you don’t.

Critical Illness Insurance – Not Just for Adults

Most of us have experienced or known someone whose family has been greatly impacted by a parent being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease or condition.  But what about when it happens to children?  Sadly, all too often children are affected by childhood diseases such as:

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Start a family conversation about elder care

By David Wm. Brown and Sarah Brown

Starting a conversation about someone’s age is a sure way to be the least popular person in the room. But while this is a no-go territory for cocktail party chatter, it’s a conversation you need to have with your parents.

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Workers unprepared for financial impact of disabilities

Most Canadian workers would suffer severe financial hardship if they were forced out of work with a disability.

In fact, 76% believe that should they become disabled and unable to work for three months, there would be serious financial implications for their family, such as significant debt or an impact on retirement plans, finds an RBC Insurance survey.

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Critical Illness: Are You Protected?

We all face many risks – contracting a critical Illness is one of them. Being diagnosed with a life threatening illness is not something one wants to contemplate however you can purchase Critical Illness Insurance to protect against the financial impact.

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Recover Your Long Term Care Costs

Will your family be affected by the costs of caring for an aging loved one?

Statistics Canada states over 350,000 Canadians 65 or older and 30% of those older than 85 will reside in long term care facilities. With increasing poor health and decreased return on investments, the fear of facing financial instability in your declining years is real.

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If you had a crippling accident or were diagnosed with a critical illness tomorrow, would your family be able to cope?

by Julie Cazzin, for Money Sense

Ten years ago, Janet Freedman was rushing out the door of her home for work. Her arms loaded with tax returns, she missed a step on the stairs on her front porch and fell, hitting her head on the concrete. When her neighbours found her, she was barely conscious, with her head trapped between her own front steps and those of the house next door.

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Brenda’s Story – Critical Illness Insurance

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How Much Risk Can You Tolerate? Part 3 of 3

Over the past two months we have examined some of the risks that challenge most of us. It is almost impossible to avoid risk entirely. Knowing where the pitfalls lie and planning for them will certainly help. You might, however, want to consider shifting the risk to someone else, like a life insurance company. Life insurance companies are in the risk business and they have products and services that can assist you in dealing with risk. Some of these are as follows:

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Cover your bases in case of an emergency

No matter how much we plan, things can and do go wrong. Here’s how to prepare yourself financially.

By Gail Vaz-Oxlade for MoneySense.ca

The mouse in Scottish poet Robbie Burns’s To a Mouse on Turning her up in her Nest with a Plough teaches us a lot about what it means to expect the unexpected. The truth is, no matter how much we plan, things can and do go wrong (in the poem the plough turns a mouse’s nest to mulch) causing all kinds of problems.

So the question becomes, do you have a back-up plan? Most people don’t. And yet, it is only those who take the time to create a Plan B that weather storms well.

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Coping with a loved one’s critical illness

The future might look bleak, but you need to move forward

We cope with all sorts of stressors every day, but when a loved one is diagnosed with a critical illness, it’s normal to feel overwhelmed. It’s hard to cope with this kind of news, not only because we want our loved one to be healthy, but also because, on a personal level, it reminds us of our own mortality.

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